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Wisconsin’s public record law states that "all persons are entitled to the greatest possible information regarding the affairs of government and the official acts of those officers and employees...

In early 1988, American farming was reaching a turning point. A small group of southwestern Wisconsin farmers—an improbable mix of back-to-the-land homesteaders (...

Public School Shakedown

 
Monday, 27 July 2015

The test-and-punish model marks a cultural shift away from the War on Poverty, and that should be a red flag for progressives.

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The test-and-punish model marks a cultural shift away from the War on Poverty, and that should be a red flag for progressives.

The Murphy Amendment (Premise: the worst parts of NCLB are actually the best parts; let's give them steroids) was one more manifestation of the Civil Rights Argument for Test and Punish. Amendment proposer Chris Murphy (D-Conn) invoked that justification for his test and punish bill, saying that ESEA "has to be a civil rights law."

Wisconsin’s public record law states that "all persons are entitled to the greatest possible information regarding the affairs of government and the official acts of those officers and employees who represent them," that there is a "presumption of complete public access," and that only in "exceptional cases" can someone be denied access to these records.

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In early 1988, American farming was reaching a turning point. A small group of southwestern Wisconsin farmers—an improbable mix of back-to-the-land homesteaders (hippies!) and salt-of-the-earth family farmers—banded together to form a co-op to sell organic vegetables. Desperation does that.

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In creating this Behavioral Guide for Republicans, my goal is to address a certain rabble-rousing Republican candidate for president whose name rhymes with “rump.” We should be able to talk about the campaign and the issues therein without constantly trumpeting said candidate’s name, right?

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As their reaction to the Iran nuclear agreement shows, the GOP presidential candidates have similarly belligerent attitudes on international issues.

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It was a banner week for the billionaires who have invested in Governor Scott Walker, the Wisconsin state legislature and the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

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July 26, 1990, was a life-changing day for people like me. Twenty-five years ago, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law. If you’re able-bodied, you may not realize how life-changing the ADA has been for people with disabilities.

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This is a sidebar to Marc Eisen's "Organic Valley at the Crossroads," which ran in our latest issue. Click here to read Marc's full story. 

Because Organic Valley began as an insurgency against corporate farming, you might think that CEO George Siemon would criticize Walmart. You would be wrong. Instead, he says that selling coop-branded milk through the retail giant has helped Organic Valley. 

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Photo: "Negotiations about Iranian Nuclear Program - the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Other Officials of the P5+1 and Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Iran and EU in Lausanne"

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The test-and-punish model marks a cultural shift away from the War on Poverty, and that should be a red flag for...

The Murphy Amendment (Premise: the worst parts of NCLB are actually the best parts; let's give them steroids) was...

Wisconsin’s public record law states that "all persons are entitled to the greatest possible information regarding...

By Wendell Berry

Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more 
of everything ready made. Be afraid 
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery 
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card 
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something 
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know. 
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord. 
Love the world. Work for nothing. 
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it. 
Denounce the government and embrace 
the flag. Hope to live in that free 
republic for which it stands. 
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man 
has not encountered he has not destroyed.
Ask the questions that have no answers. 
Invest in the millennium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.


Say that the leaves are harvested 
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus 
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion—put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come. 
Expect the end of the world. Laugh. 
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts. 
So long as women do not go cheap 
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy 
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep 
of a woman near to giving birth? 
Go with your love to the fields.
Lie easy in the shade. Rest your head 
in her lap. Swear allegiance 
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos 
can predict the motions of your mind, 
lose it. Leave it as a sign 
to mark the false trail, the way 
you didn’t go. Be like the fox 
who makes more tracks than necessary, 
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

Wendell Berry is a poet, farmer, and environmentalist in Kentucky. This poem, first published in 1973, is reprinted by permission of the author and appears in his “New Collected Poems” (Counterpoint).


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